Chinese Rice Soup - quick and easy (2022)

This Chinese Rice Soup is a really quick and easy soup recipe that’s filling and nourishing. The Asian infused soup broth adapted from myChinese Noodle Soup has a depth of flavour that belies the few ingredients called for.

In the spirit of simplicity and speed, I’ve just used fish and choy sum. But it’s excellent with shrimp/prawns, chicken, pork or even leftover cooked meats!

Chinese Rice Soup - quick and easy (1)

Quick and Easy Chinese Rice Soup

This rice soup is a really good, quick low effort meal that’s extremely versatile. Based around a simple Chinese soup broth used in several recipes I’ve previously shared, including this Chinese Noodle Soup, I think the feedback from a reader is all you need to know about this broth:

“The depth of flavour is incredible for such a simple, quick, easy soup.”
– Jay, 2 September 2020 onChinese Noodle Soup

Succinct, and to the point!

Chinese Rice Soup - quick and easy (2)

What goes in the Chinese soup broth

In this recipe, I’m using the Chinese soup broth to make a rice soup.Here’s what you need for the broth:Chinese Rice Soup - quick and easy (3)

Notes on the ingredients:

  • Rice –virtually any standard white rice will work just fine in this rice soup. Long grain, medium grain, short grain, jasmine, basmati. I’ve also popped directions for recipe adjustments required to make this with brown rice – most varieties take longer to cook so you’ll need more liquid;

  • Chicken stock/broth – low sodium is best, so it’s not too salty once you add the soy sauce and Chinese cooking wine (both of which add salt and flavour).Vegetable stock also works;

  • Chinese cooking wine – the key ingredient in all Chinese cooking that adds depth of flavour to anything it’s used in, from fried rice to stir fries, to noodles and marinades such as sticky Chinese Wings, Ribs and even crispy Pork Belly. It’s got a small amount of alcohol in it (wine level), but we only need 1 tablespoon so the alcohol mostly cooks out during the simmer stage;

  • Soy sauce – we’re using light soy sauce here so as not to discolour the rice soup broth. Read more about different soy sauces here;

  • Sesame oil – toasted sesame oil is added at the end for a lovely perfume of sesame flavour.Untoasted sesame oil is yellow and the flavour is not as strong, so don’t use that. Here in Australia, toasted sesame oil (which is brown) is the standard – it’s harder to find untoasted;

  • Fresh garlic & ginger – simmered in the broth to infuse with flavour; and

  • White pepper – white rather than black pepper is the standard in Chinese cooking so you don’t get black specks. But black pepper works just fine too.

Chinese Rice Soup Add-ins

This is the part that’s entirely customisable. I’ve just used choy sum and fish, both of which are low effort to prep plus super-quick to chop. Plus green onion to add a touch of freshness at the end.

See below for an extensive list of alternatives. Basically, anything that’s blanch-able!

Chinese Rice Soup - quick and easy (4)

Rice Soup Add-Ins

These are the add-ins I used, but see below for a rather extensive list of alternatives. I did say this was a flexible recipe!!

  • Fish – I like using fish because it drops juice that adds extra flavour into the broth, plus it’s super quick to cook and requires no seasoning prior to use. You can use virtually any fish here – white fish fillets, salmon, trout. For white fish, firm-fleshed fish are ideal, such as:

    • tilapia

    • cod (all types)

    • mahi-mahi

    • halibut

    • basa

      (Video) Chinese Rice Soup (quick & easy)

    • snapper

    • barramundi

    • ling (this is what I used)

Fish best avoided include:

    • Fish that easily goes dry if cooked too long – tuna, bonito, swordfish, marlin, kingfish

    • Very oily fish – sardines, mullet, herring, mackerel (too strongly flavoured for this soup)

    • Delicate-textured white fish – flathead, gemfish/hake, sole (not ideal as they can break up easily, but are still OK if you’re careful)

(Tip: These fish selection guidelines are good for any recipes where fish are braised or poached like this, such as Moqueca (Brazilian Fish Stew) and Goan Fish Curry.)

  • Choy sum –this is a Chinese vegetable which is widely available here in Australia. The stem has a juicy bite to it like soft celery and the leaf is similar to spinach but it’s not as fine. Quick to chop and cook. Any other Chinese vegetable will be an ideal substitute – or other vegetables that can be simmered; and

  • Green onion – for a sprinkle of freshness at the end.

Alternative Add-ins

Here are some other add-ins that will work really well with this recipe:

  • Prawns/shrimp – very quick to cook, just plonk the raw prawns straight into the broth. No need to season beforehand. Large prawns will take 3 minutes to cook, medium 2 minutes, small 1 minute;

  • Chicken – slice it thinly, then tenderise it using this simple Chinese velveting method to ensure it stays soft and tender even after simmering. After tenderising, toss with a pinch of salt and pepper prior to cooking. Use breast or boneless thigh, simmer for 2 minutes;

  • Pork – as above with chicken (including tenderising). Use tenderloin, scotch fillet or chops, thinly sliced into strips. Simmer for 2 minutes;

  • Firm Tofu – cut into small batons, like in ;

  • Cooked chicken – make poached chicken (use this Foolproof Method for the juiciest poached chicken of your life!), then slice it and place on top of soup once served in bowls. Or use any cooked chicken, shredded or diced;

  • Other cooked proteins – any other cooked protein that’s relatively plain or has Asian flavours. A bit of leftover Char Siu (Chinese BBQ Pork or Chicken), or perhaps if you have some leftover Asian flavoured mince (ground meat) such as from these quick Asian Beef Bowls, Vietnamese Caramelised Pork Bowls, or even the stuffing for San Choy Bau (Chinese Lettuce Wraps) or Thai Lettuce Wraps. Any of these would be terrific!

  • Other vegetables – any vegetable that cooks well in liquid will work well here. Think: sliced carrots, zucchini/courgettes, broccoli/broccolini, cauliflower, asparagus, beans.

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How to make Chinese Rice Soup

This recipe has a nice flow to it, which is partly what makes it so low effort:

  • Pour chicken stock into pot and as it comes to the simmer, slice the ginger, peel the garlic, measure out the soy sauce and Chinese cooking wine and plonk it in;

  • As the broth simmers for 5 minutes to infuse with flavour, prepare the rice, fish and choy sum; then

  • As the rice and fish are cooking, get the bowls out and your choice of toppings out for serving.

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Toppings

As for toppings – a little pinch of store bought crispy fried shallots and crunchy noodles really elevates this soup to another level.Don’t get me wrong – this rice soup is delicious as is and I’ve eaten it naked plenty of times, but crunchy toppings are the cherry on top!

(Video) Rice Congee - Chinese Breakfast Tutorial (米粥)

Using both is the ultimate combo, but even using one of these is terrific / highly recommended.

1. Crispy Fried Shallots

One of my favourite Asian garnishes to add a pop of crispiness and salty goodness into Asian soups and salads. They are literally shallots fried until crunchy, then sprinkled with salt.

Sold in the Asian section of grocery stores, but much cheaper at Asian stores!

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2. Crunchy fried noodles

The big sister of the thin crunchy noodles used in things like Chinese Chicken Salad, these are like the strips of fried wontons that come with Congee, the traditional slow cooked, porridge-like Chinese rice soup. Excellent crunch factor!

Sold in the Asian food section of mainstream grocery stores, here’s what it looks like:

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Chinese Rice Soup - quick and easy (9)

What to serve with Chinese Rice Soup

This soup as written is a bit light on the vegetables so by all means, feel free to increase the vegetable quota by adding more greens.

Alternatively, serve it with a side salad or steamed greens tossed in a simple Asian Sesame Dressing, or a big Asian Slaw.

Storing leftovers

Rice left in soup will continue to absorb the liquid and become unappealingly bloated, so if you’ve got leftovers, it’s essential to separate them. Either scoop the rice out with a slotted spoon, or drain using a colander, then store the rice in a separate container to the broth.

Resist the temptation to cook the rice separately and place in bowls before ladling broth over because wewant the rice to absorb the tasty flavours of the broth as it cooks!– Nagi x

Watch how to make it

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Chinese Rice Soup

Author: Nagi | RecipeTin Eats

Prep: 5 mins

Cook: 10 mins

Total: 15 mins

(Video) Thai Chicken & Rice Soup, Khao Tom Gai

Mains, Soup

Asian, Chinese

5 from 26 votes

Servings3 - 4 people

Tap or hover to scale

Print

Recipe video above. This is a really quick and easy soup recipe that's filling and nourishing. The Asian infused soup broth adapted from myChinese Noodle Souphas a depth of flavour that belies the few ingredients called for.

As for add ins -in the spirit of simplicity and speed, I've just used fish and choy sum. But you're only limited by your imagination!

Ingredients

Broth

  • 1 litre / 32 oz chicken stock/broth, low sodium (Note 1)
  • 1 cup water
  • 2 garlic cloves , smashed (Note 2)
  • 1.5 cm / 1/2" ginger piece, cut into 3 slices
  • 1 1/2 tbsp light soy sauce , or normal all purpose soy sauce (Note 3)
  • 1 1/2 tbsp Chinese cooking wine , key ingredient (Note 4 subs)
  • 1/4 - 1/2 tsp sesame oil , toasted (optional) (Note 5)
  • 1/4 tsp white pepper (sub black, can omit)

Add Ins

  • 3/4 cup uncooked white rice - long grain, medium grain, short grain, jasmine (Note 6)
  • 3 stems choy sum , cut into 2cm / 1" lengths, stems separated from leaves (Note 8)
  • 250g / 8 oz white fish fillets , cut into 2.5cm / 1" cubes (Note 8)
  • 1 green onion , finely sliced

Toppings (1 minimum, all best!)

  • Crispy fried shallots (Note 9)
  • Crunchy fried noodles , pictured in post (Note 9)
  • Chilli oil or paste

Instructions

  • Combine broth ingredients: Place chicken stock, soy sauce, Chinesse cooking wine, garlic and ginger in a small pot over high heat.

  • Simmer to infuse: Place lid on, bring to simmer then reduce to medium and simmer for 5 minutes to allow the flavours to infuse.

  • Add rice: Add rice and cook uncovered for 10 minutes - broth surface should be bubbling very gently.

  • Add fish & stems: Add fish and stems of choy sum, cook for 2 minutes.

  • Pick garlic and ginger out of soup.

    (Video) Crunchy Rice Cracker with Sichuanese Sanxian Sauce (三鲜锅巴)

  • Stir through choy sum leaves (they will wilt almost instantly), sesame oil and pepper. Serve immediately.

Recipe Notes:

1. Chicken stock/broth - just store bought chicken broth is fine here, but get a good quality one (Campbells in Australia is my favourite brand). Don't use chicken stock powder with hot water for this recipe – the flavour is too artificially chicken-y.

2. Smashed Garlic - whack the side of your knife onto a garlic clove using the heel of your hand so it bursts open but remains mostly in one piece. This allows the flavour to seep into the soup but can be picked out before serving (or leave them in if you prefer). You could just mince the garlic using a garlic crusher but you'll have little bits of garlic visible in the broth, rather than being a clear clean broth.

3. Light soywill season broth without discolouring it. All purpose soy works nearly as well, do not use dark soy (too strong flavour and colour). Read more about different soy sauces and when you can sub with what here.

4. Chinese cooking wine is a key ingredient to transform store bought chicken broth into a restaurant-quality soup broth. Dry sherry is an excellent substitute. Otherwise, Japanese cooking sake or mirin are good substitutes.

If you cannot use alcohol, I think the best sub is as follows:

  • Reduce soy sauce to 2 tsp
  • Add 1 tbsp Oyster Sauce (this hasumami and will add complexity into the broth flavour to compensate for leaving out cooking wine).

5. Sesame oil -use toasted (brown colour, more intense sesame flavour), not untoasted (yellow, not common in Australia).

6. Rice:Virtually any white rice will work in this, except speciality rices like risotto or paella rice. All these white rice will work well:

  • long, medium or short grain white rice
  • jasmine
  • basmati

Brown rice - cook time differs depending on rice type (see How to Cook Brown Rice to learn more), amend recipe as follows:

  • Brown basmati - follow recipe as written
  • Medium and long grain brown rice - add 1 cup water, simmer rice for 30 minutes with lid open a crack

7.Vegetables -anything that cooks well in liquid will work great here.

  • Any Chinese veggies - bok choy/buk choi/pak choi, gai lan/Chinese broccoli, choy sum. Cut Bok Choy into half or quarters lengthwise (pictured / video). For other veg, cut per recipe
  • Carrots and zucchini sliced, green beans, asparagus, broccoli/broccolini, cauliflower, beansprouts
  • Put vegetables in the order of time it takes for them to cook. Delicate veg like beansprouts at the end, veg that take longer like carrots halfway through rice cooking time.

8. Fish -Firm white fish work best in this dish. Salmon and trout are also mild enough to use here. Avoid tuna, bonito, swordfish, marlin and kingfish (too easy to overcook) and very oily fish (sardines, mullet, herring, mackerel). Delicate-fleshed white fish like flathead, gemfish/hake and sole can be used, but be careful as they can break up.

Alternatives:

  • Prawns/shrimp - plonk the raw prawns straight into the broth. No need to season beforehand. Large prawns will take 3 minutes to cook, medium 2 minutes, small 1 minute;
  • Chicken - slice thinly, tenderise using thisChinese velveting method to ensure it stays soft and tender. After tenderising, toss with a pinch of salt and pepper prior to cooking. Use breast or boneless thigh, simmer for 2 minutes;
  • Pork - as above with chicken (including tenderising). Tenderloin, scotch fillet, chops, thinly sliced into strips. Simmer for 2 minutes;
  • Firm Tofu - cut into small batons, like in ;
  • Cooked chicken - make poached chicken (use this Foolproof Method) or use any other cooked chicken. Dice or finely slice, place on soup after serving;
  • Other cooked proteins - any other cooked protein that's relatively plain or has Asian flavours. See in post for ideas - halfway down the page.

9.Crispy Fried Shallots & Crunchy Noodles - both sold in the Asian section of everyday grocery stores, see post for photos. A little goes a long way to adding an extra special touch! BUT even without toppings, it's still fabulously delicious - I often have it naked!

10. Extra broth flavouring options: star anise, chilli (whole, split lengthwise), green onion (whole, just fold them and tuff in) or onion quarters.

11. Leftovers: Separate rice from broth (use colander or slotted spoon). Keeps 4 days in the fridge, or freezer up to 3 months.

12. Nutrition is per serving, assuming 4 servings, excludes Toppings (because I have no control over how much you will use!).

Nutrition Information:

Serving: 585gCalories: 243cal (12%)Carbohydrates: 32g (11%)Protein: 20g (40%)Fat: 4g (6%)Saturated Fat: 1g (6%)Cholesterol: 31mg (10%)Sodium: 483mg (21%)Potassium: 438mg (13%)Fiber: 1g (4%)Sugar: 1g (1%)Vitamin A: 105IU (2%)Vitamin C: 2mg (2%)Calcium: 28mg (3%)Iron: 1mg (6%)

Keywords: asian soup broth, chinese rice soup

Did you make this recipe?I love hearing how you went with my recipes! Tag me on Instagram at @RecipeTinEats.

(Video) VEGAN RICE NOODLE SOUP BOWL | ASIAN INSPIRED | EASY DINNER IDEA

Life of Dozer

A lot of golden retrievers are coordinated enough to do this on dry land. Dozer needs the full assistance of water buoyancy to get up on this hind legs without slamming his paws onto someone for support (usually me).

(PS This is his “pretty please, play with me?!” pose)

Chinese Rice Soup - quick and easy (11)

FAQs

Can you just add rice to soup? ›

Can you put uncooked rice in soup? Yes – uncooked rice is best to add into soup because it soaks up the flavour of the broth, making it extra tasty!

What is rice soup made of? ›

Rice Soup is a delicious appetizer recipe that can be enjoyed in any season. This Thai recipe is prepared with rice, coconut milk, spring onions, starch and a melange of spices and tastes amazing. You can add your choice of vegetables to increase the flavour of this soup.

Which rice is best for soup? ›

While rice can be cooked in soup, some varieties of rice produce a better result than others in terms of texture and resilience. You may get particularly good results with arborio, carnarolli, and other risotto rices, as well as any type of brown rice. Red rice, black rice, and wild rice also work well in some soups.

Can I cook rice in soup instead of water? ›

Rice can also be cooked in a soup instead of separately in water and mixed together after. For best results, you should choose a suitable variety of rice, rinse it well, cook it in well-seasoned seasoned stock, and be careful not to overcook.

Is rice soup good for weight loss? ›

Foods like rice are high in Glycemic index are not suitable for weight loss, heart patients, diabetics as they affect the blood sugar control levels.

Is soup and rice healthy? ›

According to Diwekar, having rice soup for dinner can soothe the stomach and nerves, and helps you have a restful sleep at night. It helps in regulation of hormones, uplifts your mood and improves exercise performance.

What is watery rice called? ›

Congee is often consumed for breakfast or as an easily digestible food for children and those who are ill.

What do Chinese put in their soups? ›

Traditionally, Chinese slow-cooked soups are made from lean meats, fish, vegetables, and natural flavorings such as fresh herbs.

Is Chinese soup healthy? ›

Chinese soups are well known for their “powers” of rejuvenation. Trusted for thousands of years, Chinese soups have been used as natural supplements to boost immune systems, ward of common ailments, as well as boost energy levels of active adults and even athletes.

What is Chinese noodle soup called? ›

Ramen (ラーメン) – thin light yellow noodle served in hot chicken or pork broth, flavoured with soy or miso, with various toppings such as slices of pork, menma (pickled bamboo shoots), seaweed, or boiled egg. Also known as Shina-soba or Chuka-soba (both mean "Chinese soba").

Which Chinese soup is best for a cold? ›

Ginger Garlic Soup is one of our favourite healthy soup recipes to fight cold and flu.

Is wonton soup healthy? ›

Benefit #1: Wonton Soup is Rich in Protein

The pork and shrimp filling from the dumplings are packed with protein, making the soup a great dish to increase your protein intake. In addition to the poultry, the soup uses chicken broth as its base, which is also rich in protein.

How do you eat Chinese soup? ›

When eating the noodle soup, use the chopsticks to move your noodles and other solid goodies into the spoon and then pack some broth into the spoon before guiding the spoonful into your mouth. You can simply tip the tapered front of the spoon into your mouth, or use your chopsticks to help the noodles into your mouth.

How do you keep rice from getting mushy in soup? ›

To keep the rice from getting mushy in soup, it's best to add cooked rice at the very end. Simmer just long enough to warm the rice through. We like classic long-grain white rice, but any variety of cooked rice will work in this soup. Try brown rice or wild rice for a heartier, nuttier taste and texture.

How do you thicken soup with rice? ›

A handful of uncooked rice. That's all folks, just a handful of white rice. Any kind will do: jasmine, basmati, short grain, long grain. When added to a brothy (or watery, even) soup, and left to simmer for 20-30 minutes, the rice breaks down, releasing its starch and thickening the liquid that it's cooking in.

How can you thicken soup? ›

Add flour or cornflour

Put a tablespoon of either into a small bowl and stir in 2-3 tbsp of the soup until you have a smooth mixture. Stir this back into the soup and bring it to a simmer. Cook for a few minutes to allow the starch granules to burst to thicken, and to cook out any flour flavour.

Do you wash rice before adding it to soup? ›

While the starch dust might help thicken your soup, the rice should still be washed before cooking to remove any dirt, chemicals, and bugs that might be present.

Do you need to rinse rice before adding to soup? ›

Uncooked white rice, basmati rice, and brown rice all should be rinsed well before adding them to soup to rinse out the extra starch that could make the rice sticky and gummy.

Can I use chicken broth instead of water for rice? ›

You can increase the flavor of your dish, exponentially, just by cooking rice with chicken broth, instead of water. The chicken broth will leave your rice moist, salty, and for such a simple substitution. Your friends and family will be wondering how you made such tasty rice!

How can I lose my belly fat? ›

To battle belly fat:
  1. Eat a healthy diet. Focus on plant-based foods, such as fruits, vegetables and whole grains, and choose lean sources of protein and low-fat dairy products. ...
  2. Replace sugary beverages. ...
  3. Keep portion sizes in check. ...
  4. Include physical activity in your daily routine.

How much cup of rice should I eat a day to lose weight? ›

Women wanting to lose weight should eat about 37 g of rice per portion.

Can we eat rice at night? ›

It is not considered proper to consume rice after sunset, however, it is not considered right to eat any carbohydrate food in the evening or at night. Eating carbohydrate foods at night can lead to obesity and stomach bloating. Also, eating rice at night can also cause colds, coughs, and colds.

What are the benefits of rice soup? ›

Here Are 5 Well-Known Health Benefits Of Kanji Or Rice Water:
  • Aids Digestive Processes. Experts recommend drinking rice water to soothe digestive ailments such as food poisoning, diarrhoea and even indigestion. ...
  • Boost Energy And Mood. ...
  • Helps Stay Hydrated. ...
  • Good for Hair Growth. ...
  • Maintain Healthy And Supple Skin.
20 May 2022

How do you eat rice soup? ›

I like doing the rice on spoon and dipping it in the soup so I can have options :P. I think this is the best way to do it. Keep them separate, but get a little bit of rice and stew on each bite. That way, you can choose to have a bite of either one separately if you want.

Is it good to drink boiled rice water? ›

Drinking cooked rice water can help in improving digestion, relieves constipation and can prevent several ailments. Rice water is packed with the goodness of minerals and healthy carbohydrates, thus drinking a glass of rice water every morning can give your body ample energy to stay active throughout the day.

Why is my rice sticky and mushy? ›

Mushy or soggy rice is simply overcooked rice that has absorbed too much water. Water over-absorption causes the rice grains to split open, ruining the texture and creating a starchy, gummy result.

Why is my rice sticky after cooking? ›

When rice is shipped, grains jostle around and rub against one another; some of the outer starch scratches off. When the now starch-coated rice hits the boiling water, the starch blooms and gets sticky.

What does soup mean in Chinese? ›

首 [Shou / Siu] Meaning: head, leader, beginning, the first.

What does hot and sour soup taste like? ›

Hot and Sour soup is a Chinese soup that's savoury, spicy and tangy. The broth is thickened and it's filled with mushrooms, tofu, bamboo shoots and silky egg ribbons. The flavour and textures in this soup are an addictive combination, making it a firm Chinese restaurant favourite!

What is the healthiest Chinese soup? ›

Best: Tom Yum Soup

It's a healthy pick. Tom yum has fewer than 100 calories per cup. It also has shrimp, veggies, and fragrant spices, such as lemongrass. Tom yum and other broth-based soups, like tofu-vegetable or wonton, are usually lower in fat and calories than soups made with coconut milk, such as tom kha.

What's the healthiest Chinese food? ›

Healthier choices include steamed brown rice, sautéed or steamed vegetables, spring rolls, or soups like egg drop soup or hot and sour soup. Veggie-based items like edamame, lettuce wraps, braised bamboo shoots, or cucumber salad are a few other great options you can try.

Why do Chinese drink soup before meals? ›

It's there that the Chinese believe in drinking hot soup as it “clears heat” in the body. On top of this, the Cantonese also believe that hot soup can nourish one's beauty, strengthen physical health, and even prevent and cure diseases.

What is short Soup Chinese? ›

Short soup basically refers to a soup with wontons. This is also known as wonton soup. Wontons are small, round dumplings with a savory filling. They are usually eaten boiled in soups. Wontons have square wrappers made with wheat flour, egg, water, and salt.

What are Chinese rice noodles? ›

Rice noodles, also called mifen, mixian, hefen, or mimian, are a popular and traditional food in China. Processing procedures used to make traditional Chinese rice noodles include soaking, grinding, heating (steaming or boiling), molding (extruding or cutting), cooling, and drying (13).

What are thick rice noodles called? ›

Udon. A Japanese noodle variety that can be served hot or cold, udon is very thick and fat, occasionally flat but most often rounded, like super inflated spaghetti. Udon is chewy and dense, standing up to hot broths or stir-frying without falling apart.

How do you keep rice from getting mushy in soup? ›

To keep the rice from getting mushy in soup, it's best to add cooked rice at the very end. Simmer just long enough to warm the rice through. We like classic long-grain white rice, but any variety of cooked rice will work in this soup. Try brown rice or wild rice for a heartier, nuttier taste and texture.

How do you keep rice from soaking in soup? ›

Be sure to wait until the soup is cooled before adding the rice; this will minimize the amount of broth the rice soaks up as it sits. If it's at all warm, the rice will continue to cook as it cools. Or, you can precook the rice for 10 minutes, store it separately from the soup, and add it to the soup as it's reheating.

Should I rinse rice before adding to soup? ›

Uncooked white rice, basmati rice, and brown rice all should be rinsed well before adding them to soup to rinse out the extra starch that could make the rice sticky and gummy.

Do you need to wash rice for soup? ›

As it turns out, rinsing your grains is a key step if you want to make the perfect pot of rice, and that's true whether you're preparing a creamy rice pudding or whipping up a savory chicken and rice soup.

When should you add cooked rice to soup? ›

Let the soup simmer for 15 or 20 minutes, then add leftover cooked rice before serving and let heat for one more minute before serving.

How do you thicken soup with rice? ›

A handful of uncooked rice. That's all folks, just a handful of white rice. Any kind will do: jasmine, basmati, short grain, long grain. When added to a brothy (or watery, even) soup, and left to simmer for 20-30 minutes, the rice breaks down, releasing its starch and thickening the liquid that it's cooking in.

Can you leave rice in soup overnight? ›

The short answer is that she absolutelyshould throw it out. Leaving cooked rice unrefrigerated all day is dangerous, especially for small children and those with immune-compromised systems. ... Uncooked rice can contain spores of bacillus cereus and those spores survive cooking.

Is Jasmine rice the healthiest? ›

Which one is healthier? Both white rice and white jasmine rice are refined grains, as their fibrous and nutritious parts have been removed. This makes them nearly equivalent nutritionally. Due to their lack of fiber and protein, your body digests them easily, potentially leading to blood sugar spikes ( 20 ).

Can you reheat chicken and rice soup? ›

To reheat, microwave your soup for 30 seconds at a time until heated through. You can also reheat in a pot on the stovetop over medium heat. If you've found that the rice has absorbed too much of the liquid and the soup consistency is too thick, add some more chicken broth or water.

What happens if you dont wash rice? ›

If the grains aren't washed before cooking, this residual starch will gelatinize in the hot cooking water and make the cooked grains of rice stick to each other. In some instances, such as sticky rice varieties like glutinous rice and arborio rice, this can lead to a very gummy texture.

How long does it take for uncooked rice to cook in soup? ›

When you're adding uncooked rice to soup, it makes sense to spoon out the larger ingredients, such as hunks of chicken, carrot or celery, and set them aside as the rice cooks for the 20 to 35 minutes required. This prevents overcooking of vegetables or other ingredients.

Why should rice not be washed? ›

According to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the U.S., washing rice before it is cooked may send valuable protein down the drain, as well as other water-soluble nutrients.

Why do Asians wash rice? ›

"[Basmati] rice, that comes from the northern part of India and all the way through to Afghanistan, is a very long-grain rice and long-grain rice absorbs a lot of water," says Tan. "So that's why [South Asian people] always tend to wash the rice first and then, after that, it soaks [in order] for the rice to expand."

Why is my rice always sticky? ›

When rice is shipped, grains jostle around and rub against one another; some of the outer starch scratches off. When the now starch-coated rice hits the boiling water, the starch blooms and gets sticky.

How much water do I use for 2 cups of rice? ›

To cook rice, the general rule of thumb is to use 2 cups of water for every 1 cup of rice. So, for 2 cups of rice, you would need to use 4 cups of water.

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Author: Virgilio Hermann JD

Last Updated: 08/17/2022

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Author information

Name: Virgilio Hermann JD

Birthday: 1997-12-21

Address: 6946 Schoen Cove, Sipesshire, MO 55944

Phone: +3763365785260

Job: Accounting Engineer

Hobby: Web surfing, Rafting, Dowsing, Stand-up comedy, Ghost hunting, Swimming, Amateur radio

Introduction: My name is Virgilio Hermann JD, I am a fine, gifted, beautiful, encouraging, kind, talented, zealous person who loves writing and wants to share my knowledge and understanding with you.